Finishing Last: The Red Lantern

Raise the Red LanternThe original title of this blog by marketing wunderkind Seth Godin made me remember the book and subsequent 1991 film by Zhang Yimou. This message is clearly directed at parents and teachers who often ignore follow the carrot and stick method to discipline and have no clue about perseverance.

My own persistence even when I may be perceived as finishing last comes from my uncle Andrew Arries, who turned 87 years recently in Uitenhage. Even at this age he has never stopped giving more than he receives, helping to raise my sisters children, helping to look after my mother’s house, and also taking care of his own needs from cooking, to cleaning to shopping.

Two weeks ago his 2nd brother died. He has one brother and sister remaining, and may yet be standing when I look at his energy levels and love for life. He was like my grandfather and father rolled into one.

…. from the Seth Godin blog ….

At the grueling Iditarod, there’s a prize for the musher who finishes last: The Red Lantern.

Failing to finish earns you nothing, of course. But for the one who sticks it out, who arrives hours late, there’s the respect that comes from finding the strength to make it, even when all seems helpless.

Most parents (and most bosses) agree that this sort of dedication is a huge asset in life. And yet, as we head back for another year of school, I can’t help but notice that schools do nothing at all to encourage it.

The coach of the soccer team doesn’t reward the players who try the hardest, push themselves or put in the hours. He rewards the best players, by playing them.

The director of the school play puts the same kids in leading roles year after year. After all, the reasoning goes, we need to have tryouts and reward the best performers, just like they do in real life.

But school isn’t real life. School is about learning how to succeed in real life.

Natural talent is rewarded early and often. As Malcolm Gladwell has pointed out, most of the players in the NHL have birthdays in a three month window, because when you’re 8 years old, being six months older is a huge advantage. Those kids, the skaters with good astrological signs, or possibly those performers with the genetic singing advantage–those are the kids that get the coaching and the applause and the playing time. Unearned advantages, multiplied.

If we’re serious about building the habits of success, tracking is precisely the wrong approach. Talent (born with or born without) is not your fault, is not a choice, is not something we ought to give you much credit or blame for.

How do we celebrate the Red Lantern winners instead?