Uitenhage’s name changed to “Qhagqiwa” or “Garden Town”?

Is it really worth changing a name when that name is internationally known for various aspects, one of them being home to the largest car factory on the African continent?

Is it worth spending millions of Rands on changing a name when “insufficient funds” are so often named as the reason or excuse for lack of maintenance on basic services?

These are but two of the hundreds of comments, outbursts and reactions from the public on social platforms after the Eastern Cape government announced that it is considering changing Uitenhage’s name to “Qhagqiwa” or “Garden Town”.

Comments like: “if the name Uitenhage can’t even be spelled correctly on nameboards, imagine the new name”, “We will be totally lost, not knowing where the heck it is. Poor tourists … not a good idea”, “Is a name change really necessary? This is a political stunt to gain votes”, “Absurd. There are far more important things to spend tax money on”, “What will be the benefits of it? Surely the money could be much better spent on service delivery?”

There were, however, a few people who felt positive about Uitenhage being named “Qhagqiwa”.

Deshun Deysel
Mountaineer Deshun Deysel was born in Uitenhage

The Eastern Cape Geographical Names Committee also announced that public participation hearings would be held after to the local government elections on August 3.

The other name changes include Port Elizabeth (to be changed to Gqeberha) and the Port Elizabeth airport (to be named Sipho Hashe Airport).

Zukile Jodwana, a member of the Eastern Cape geographical names committee said “This is a lengthy process and can take up to six months.

“We have received the applications, but now we have to hold public meetings in the communities where residents can voice their opinions and air their grievances.

“Then we must make a recommendation to the national geographical names committee, which in turn must submit its recommendations to the Minister of Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture.”

There are various notable persons linked to Uitenhage. Saying that Enoch Sontonga, Allan Hendrickse, Smuts Ngonyama, Sean Burke, Ton Vosloo, Linky Boshoff, Garth Wright, Deshun Deysel and Loyiso Bala hail from Qhagqiwa, simply lacks any significance.

  • Uitenhage was founded on 25 April 1804 and named in honour of General Jacob Abraham Uitenhage De Mist.

source: UD News/News24

Illegal Animal Breeding in Uitenhage

Most of us are ignorant about municipal by-laws in South Africa, let alone, Uitenhage. On Facebook I’m the admin for the Uitenhage Forum group with over 12,600 active members.

This message was posted on by Gershwin Maduna “Enige iemand wat op soek is na pitbull puppys ek ht 3 teefies….enge iemnd wt belangstel kontak my 0828883457 watsapp ook.

Animal Anti-Cruelty League Uitenhage

Carrie Pratt reported this post and brought it to my attention:

“It is against municipal bylaws to allow your dog or cat to have a litter unless registered as a legal breeder currently there are 11 legal breeders none for pitbull it is also I legal to hawk /sell puppies which includes social media by allowing such post it supports illegal back yard breeders I and these kind of posts are becoming more frequent which is very concerning I hope you can understand my concern with such posts.

Much appreciated and to add all females over 6 months should be spayed all relevant detail can be obtained from animal anticruelty league and dog control to confirm my statements are accurate.”

Visit US newsrooms as part of #impactAFRICA

Want to win a trip to some of America’s best digital newsrooms?

 Visit US newsrooms as part of #impactAFRICA

Your watchdog journalism on #water? and #sanitation? issues could win you a 10-day all-expenses paid trip to the best digital newsrooms in three U.S cities.

Stories can be published / broadcast on any platform, in any format, between between March 30 and July 15.

Submit your stories here: http://bit.ly/impactAFRICA

You can visit the #impactAFRICA community at: https://www.facebook.com/impactafricacontest/

The contest is run by the continent’s largest data journalism fund, Impact Africa, as part of an initiative by Code For Africa and the International Center for Journalists.