Global Conference TEDx comes to Nelson Mandela Bay

TED Talks have become a global phenomenon since the first videos were published online in 2005. TEDxPortElizabeth, a full day TEDx conference licensed by TED, will be held for the first time in the Friendly City on Friday 1 July 2016. The conference will take place on the AFDA Film School, 28 Bird Street, Central, Port Elizabeth.

We are proud to be associated with TEDx, because AFDA also believes passionately in the power of ideas to change the world,” says Uitenhage-born, Denise Roodt, who is also campus dean. “Our students are taught to conceptualise, develop and create indigenous entertainment products for the local and international market; so, like TEDx, we also nurture local ideas worth spreading“. AFDA is one of the leading outcomes-based film schools in the world and is the only one in Africa ever to have won a student Oscar.

AFDA opens Port Elizabeth campus in 2015
AFDA Port Elizabeth campus opens its doors in 2015

Attending such an event is an inspiring learning opportunity, where you engage with over 100 guests, getting a chance to network, communicate and have exhilarating conversation, with a diverse crowd, having many different experiences and backgrounds. “The TEDx platform connects Nelson Mandela Bay with a global community of innovators and activists,” says Ramon Thomas, founder of TEDxPortElizabeth. “Everyone who attends will join this exclusive community who value ideas worth spreading more than anything else.”

The theme for this year’s conference is, “Through The Looking Glass”, a take on the sequel to Alice in Wonderland. Come and be part of the TEDxPortElizabeth experience as you are captivated by an exciting array of speakers delivering talks from education to personal life experiences. These speakers will examine topics from a different angle, using this creative platform to reveal something you would have never thought of – leaving you with knowledge that is informative and inspiring.

The following speakers are from Uitenhage:

  1. Caleb Zealand, (7-year old) Child Palaeontologist – Why Kids Love Dinosaurs
  2. Colleen Grewar, Artist – Bratz vs Barbie Dolls
  3. Deshun Deysel, International Business Coach  – Peak Performance
  4. Elizabeth Muller, Librarian – Children & Reading
  5. Joe Slingers, Educator – Timeless Literature

TEDx Port Elizebeth 2016 Conference Line-up

Media Contacts

Ramon Thomas – Mobile: +27814399555 – Send Email

About TEDx, x = independently organized event

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talk videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

About TED

TED is a non-profit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or fewer) delivered by today’s leading thinkers and doers. Many of these talks are given at TED’s annual conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, and made available, free, on TED.com. TED speakers have included Al Gore, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Jane Goodall, Sir Richard Branson, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Salman Khan and Daniel Kahneman.

TED’s open and free initiatives for spreading ideas include TED.com, where new TED Talk videos are posted daily; the Open Translation Project, which provides subtitles and interactive transcripts as well as translations from thousands of volunteers worldwide; the educational initiative TED-Ed; the annual million-dollar TED Prize, which funds exceptional individuals with a “wish,” or idea, to create change in the world; TEDx, which provides licenses to thousands of individuals and groups who host local, self-organized TED-style events around the world; and the TED Fellows program, which selects innovators from around the globe to amplify the impact of their remarkable projects and activities.

Follow TED on Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

 

2016 Twitter Blanket Drive Ends With Passion

On 26 May 2016 the first ever annual Twitter Blanket Drive #TBD2016 to be held in Nelson Mandela Bay will come to an end. Since 2010 people with passion have joined the #TBD2016 call to donate old or new blankets across South Africa for this campaign.

Twitter Blanket Drive started in 2010 in South Africa when Melanie Minnaar challenged the Twitter Community to each donate one blanket during winter. The Twitter community responded with compassion and engaged on the social media platform to collect blankets for some of the country’s most vulnerable people. Over the past six years, thousands of blankets have been collected in the weeks leading up to winter to provide some relief and, of course, warmth to those in need.

During Nelson Mandela Bay’s first participation partners such as the Protea Hotel Marine, Summerstrand; Wild Rapids Spur in Uitenhage and Panarottis in Despatch all hosted the drop-off zones for the 2016 Twitter Blanket Drive campaign.

The fact that we could participate in this year really warmed my heart, and this really motivated me to collect blankets to keep Port Elizabeth warm,” says Eileen Koeberg, one of the #TBD2016 volunteers. “It opened hearts that my colleagues and friends gave their blankets and those who donated blankets, did so with much love.

The Salvation Army has been chosen as the NGO to receive the blankets this year as they are known for their work among the poorest and most destitute people in local communities. Twittering people with passion donated over 100 blankets.

The Twitter Blanket Drive helps people to get involved by helping organisations like ourselves make a difference in the lives of those less fortunate than us. It is important for us to count on each other to make this possible,” says Major Valerie Potgieter, head of the Salvation Army in Uitenhage. “We will make sure that those on the streets become our priority with this drive and so meet the most needy during this winter time.

Twitter Blanket Drive Event Invitation:

All are invited to join the hand-over parties on Thursday, 26 May at the following venues and times:

Nelson Mandela Bay residents can make their final blanket donations at the above venues, join the hosts and people with passion from Twitter.

Twitter Blanket Drive Media Contacts

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2016 Twitter Blanket Drive

Twitter Blanket Drive arrives in Uitenhage

The drop-off zones in Nelson Mandela Bay:

Twitter Blanket Drive started in 2010 in South Africa. The Twitter community moved by compassion and has engaged the social media platform to collect blankets for some of the country’s most vulnerable people. Over the past 6 years, thousands of blankets have been collected in the weeks leading up to winter to provide some relief and, of course, warmth to those in need.

Nelson Mandela Bay residents can now also take part in the Twitter Blanket Drive with two drop-off points – one in Port Elizabeth and one in Uitenhage.

“More than any other social media, Twitter is about local conversations,” says Ramon Thomas, local co-ordinator for the Twitter Blanket Drive in Port Elizabeth, and founder of TEDxPortElizabeth. “The #TBD2016 campaign shows how we can use social media to take action in local communities not just for national issues of a political nature.”

“For us as a Twitter community, social responsibility is a serious business,” says Merentia van der Vent, the national co-ordinator and Cape Town host for the Twitter Blanket Drive (TBD). “As winter’s bite fast approaches, we are aware that charities are under a huge amount of pressure to meet the demand for blankets. In today’s digital world, we have the power to make significant change, in the area of social development, harnessing the power of social media.”

The TBD started 7 years ago, in 2010, as a single tweet by Melanie Minnaar, as she contemplated the cold winter ahead and in true Twitter style, tweeted the following thought: “what if each person on Twitter donated a blanket?”

Melanie Minnaar Twitter Blanket Drive South Africa

Since then, the TBD movement has exploded and now has a national footprint with campaign drives taking place in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Durban, Pretoria and the West Coast. Previous years it was also held in Bloemfontein, East London, George, Knysna and Mossel Bay and countries like Zimbabwe & Namibia. This year the official hashtag is #TBD2016.

Last year, the Instagram community in South Africa, also supported the #TwitterBlanketDrive and collected blankets on their #Instawalks across the country. South Africans are also asked via Facebook to donate blankets.

In today’s fast paced world, using social media to increase community awareness is not only smart, but essential. According to the founder of the campaign, Melanie Minnaar, the Twitter Blanket Drive has injected a true sense of community into the South African Twittersphere, as the number of Twitter users involved with the TBD has grown exponentially since 2010. Tens of thousands of blankets have over the years been donated, to those in need.

Support Our Twitter Blanket Drive

Blankets can be dropped off at drop-off zones across the country from 7 April to Thursday 26 May 2016.

Call the local co-ordinator 081-4399555 or via Twitter: @RamonThomas

Boxing promoter may buy ailing Bay Utd

UITENHAGE-BORN businessman, Butityi Konki, may be in the queue to purchase ailing Port Elizabeth-based First Division soccer side Bay United.

Konki, who is International Boxing Federation lightweight contender Ali Funeka’s business manager, said he would not have a problem being the club’s new owner after United owners, Izingwe Holdings’ decision to get rid of the club.

Izingwe Holdings threw in the towel after United’s failure to return to the Premier Soccer League (PSL) next season.

“Izingwe Holdings regrets to announce that Bay United Football Club will immediately cease conducting business while beginning an extensive process that may lead to the sale of the club,” a statement released by the club said.

“I’m going to speak to my legal advisers in Port Elizabeth about whether to get involved at Bay United or not. I could be interested in the club as many people have called asking me to buy it,” said Konki.

Apart from the club’s failure to return to the PSL, the owners say there were other issues that prompted them to give up on Umlilo.

These included the PSL’s imposition of a R1.3 million liability following the club’s retrenchment of players at the end of the 2008/9 season.

Their unsuccessful attempts to get financial and other forms of sponsorship assistance from the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, the Eastern Cape provincial government and commercial sponsors, also contributed to Izingwe Holdings’ decision. “We will engage with all the creditors of the club, including the players. No final decision will be taken until discussions have been held with all relevant parties.

“We undertake to do our best to resolve this matter in the best interests of all parties,” said club boss Sipho Pityana.

Pityana tried to sell United to Konki after they were relegated from the PSL at the end of last season, but the deal fell through.

Pityana informed Konki last year that he was selling United for R15m, but the Johannesburg-based businessman said he was prepared to part with only R5m. “There was no way that I could pay that kind of money for a team that had just been relegated from the PSL.

“I was only prepared to pay R5m but I got no response after writing to Pityana indicating my interest,” said Konki.

– By MONWABISI JIMLONGO

source: Daily Dispatch

Redhouse dump also an eyesore

background) and the rubbish dumped on the ground is causing concern for Redhouse residents, who say the municipality doesn’t listen to their appeals for the area to be cleaned up.

IN The Herald on Thursday I saw the municipal dumpsite eyesore in Rosedale (“Separate Uitenhage from Mandela Bay!”), so I took some pictures of the Redhouse dumpsite which has the same problem. The Redhouse residents also blame the municipality for poor service delivery.

Phoning them does not help. Hopefully they will see this in The Herald and clear all the rubbish. – D Robertson, Redhouse, Port Elizabeth

source: The Weekend Post

Rehab ‘explosion’ as youth switch on to tik

USE of the debilitating drug tik has exploded in Nelson Mandela Bay, with experts saying it has become the drug of choice among youth due to its availability and affordability.

While there are no official statistics on the severity of the problem, Shepherd‘s Field Rehabilitation Centre outside Port Elizabeth reports that tik addicts now account for 57 per cent of its patients.

And the SA National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (Sanca) in Port Elizabeth said its number of addicts on tik had more than doubled in the last six months.

As the second cheapest drug on the streets after dagga, tik has saturated the city‘s poorest communities.

The drug can get a buyer a “high” for just R20, but experts warn it causes parts of the brain to “dissolve” after prolonged use.

Tik is made up primarily of crystal methamphetamine, but can also include a number of household products such as anti-freeze, slimming drugs, rat poison and household cleaning products.

Sanca information, training and education co-ordinator Zarina Ghulam said the drug had infiltrated the northern areas of Port Elizabeth specifically and that the number of users was growing rapidly.

“From July to December last year, we‘ve seen a huge jump of tik users coming to us for treatment.

“It went from 3,1% to 7,2% in those six months. Although we do not have the latest figures available for the last couple of months, I can definitely say the numbers are growing rapidly.

“The majority of the people who come to us for tik abuse are from the northern areas and it‘s moving to Uitenhage.”

Tik was first identified as a potential problem in the Bay two years ago when gangsters were being paid for poached perlemoen with tik by Cape Town crime barons.

Shepherd‘s Field chief executive Gerrie Cronje said the number of tik users at their centre accounted for 57% of people admitted for substance abuse.

Although a number of these addicts came from Cape Town, the majority were from the Nelson Mandela Bay area.

Reinhardt Coetsee, director of Rei‘s Place House of Recovery at Greenbushes in Port Elizabeth, said it was evident that tik was a fast growing problem in the city.

“Although it hasn‘t hit PE as bad as Cape Town, it is definitely a major concern and the problem is escalating.”

Humewood Community Police Forum chairman John Preller said the number of tik users attending his group meetings was increasing.

“We‘re definitely seeing an upward trend. Numbers are increasing drastically and the alarming thing is that it is younger people between the ages of 18 and 25.

“Tik has found its way to PE from Cape Town and we can no longer say it‘s coming, because it‘s here, and it‘s growing.

“The scary thing is that people only seek help when their lives become unmanageable, when the problem is at its worst.”

Aaron Liddell, a recovering tik addict at Shepherd‘s Field, said he was able to buy tik on nearly every street corner as it was so freely available.

“I can get it from the guy down the street or go to any of the coloured areas and buy it. It‘s everywhere. It‘s even in schools and prisons.”

Ghulam said it had devastating long-term effects on the body, although tik users were often swindled by the initial feelings of euphoria, increased energy and self-confidence.

“One client who came in for treatment ended up in hospital. They discovered he had holes in his brain because of the tik and he had to have two brain surgeries. They couldn‘t do anything to repair his brain, so he died.”

She said tik users were prone to HIV/Aids because the drug heightened arousal, which could lead to high-risk sexual behaviour.

Preller said it caused extreme aggression, which often led to uncontrollable violence. “Just recently, I heard from a parent who said her son beat her because of his tik aggression,” he added.

Preller said some of the permanent effects of the toxic drug were that it dissolved the teeth and areas of the brain.

Substance abuse in the northern areas was one of the main reasons for the disintegration of families and gangsterism there, he said.

Tik addiction also had a drastic effect on the economy, and on families, said Preller, with addicts ultimately losing jobs and homes torn apart.

“With tik, they lose their ability to think straight and they end up getting fired.

“Shortly after that they‘ll start breaking into houses or hijacking cars to get money to buy more drugs and most of the time end up in jail.

“You end up losing a strong productive person in the economy, and if you multiply that by the thousands of tik users we see, it results in the loss of thousands of productive people in the economy.”

Source : The Weekend Post

Hostage drama accused wanted to ‘sort things out’ after affair rumours

A MOTHERWELL hostage-taker yesterday claimed in the magistrate‘s court that he had gone to the house of the victims to “sort things out” with his girlfriend after he heard allegations of an affair.

Xola Stanley Zembethe, 36, faces charges of kidnapping and illegal possession of a firearm and ammunition stemming from a tense 16-hour standoff between him and a police contingent.

The drama unfolded on February 16 in Ndlovu Street, where Zembethe allegedly took hostage his girlfriend‘s sister, Nompumelelo Myali, her year-old son Lisa, another son, Mafixole, 19, and a relative, Simphiwe Wilskuit, 23.

Zembethe, of Uitenhage, and his girlfriend, Bulelwa Jack, were embroiled in counter accusations of cheating on each other, the court heard.

During a bail hearing yesterday, Zembethe said he would plead not guilty to the charges when the matter went to trial. He insisted on conducting his own defence.

He said that after he had arrived in Motherwell from Cape Town that morning, he had wanted to set the record straight regarding rumours that he had cheated on Jack. “Prior to this, I received a phone call saying I must not accuse her of cheating because I was also having an affair. They also accused me of having killed my mother and children. I said, ‘I will deal with you when I arrive in Port Elizabeth because of false allegations‘,” said Zembethe.

Shortly after his arrival at the house, four occupants were held hostage, allegedly by Zembethe, and threatened with a firearm.

Two shots were fired. A firearm was allegedly taken from Zembethe after the incident. He claimed he had found it on a Jeffreys Bay beach in December.

Zembethe refuted claims by the state that he had a tendency to watch hostage-drama films.

Investigating officer Inspector Monde Sithole testified that Zembethe had demanded Myali call her husband, Simphiwe, and tell him to bring Jack from Despatch.

Asked why he wanted to be released on bail, he said he was responsible for his 13-year-old child, he was required to perform elder duties in the Presbyterian Church of Africa and he was also the co-ordinator of an HIV/Aids project

The matter was postponed to March 19 for the investigating officer to verify Zembethe‘s previous convictions. The state alleges he has several previous convictions, including car theft and armed robbery.

He has two pending case involving shoplifting and arson.

source: The Weekend Post

Booysen Park principal is SA‘s best

Dineo Matomela EDUCATION REPORTER

PORT ELIZABETH‘S Bruce Damons is the best primary school principal in South Africa – and that‘s official.

The dynamic headmaster of Sapphire Road Primary School in Booysen Park scored top marks in the National Teachers‘ Awards, organised by the education department.

At a glittering function in Pretoria on Wednesday night, attended by President Kgalema Motlanthe and Education Minister Naledi Pandor, Damons won the Excellence in Primary School Leadership Award.

Damons has been at Sapphire since 2000. Under his leadership the school has opened a clinic run by volunteers. It has no-fee status and has a food garden as well as offering sewing lessons.

National education spokesman Lunga Ngqengelele said the department paid tribute to the role of principals and teachers like Damons.

“He is one of the people we hold in high esteem. We are proud of them and want them to continue the good work they do because they are good examples of what teachers can offer,” he said.

Damons flew to Pretoria on Wednesday and will return today to a congratulatory ceremony organised by his teachers and pupils this morning.

Speaking from Pretoria yesterday, Damons said his success was not an individual one, but a community effort.

“This is not my award, but belongs to the wonderful people I work with like teachers, volunteers, parents and pupils who inspire me to get up every day.

“I dedicate the award to the entire school, to the first group of pupils who died of Aids-related illnesses, and all the people who make the school a success.”

Damons said he was honoured to have met Motlanthe and Pandor. “The highlight of the ceremony was shaking hands with President Motlanthe and being the only teacher representing the Eastern Cape.

“I‘m now more motivated to work harder because I have seen how other schools have made their schools a success.”

source:The Herald

Bus plan thrown into disarray

Sbongile Dimbaza and Mawande Jack HERALD REPORTERS

CONSTRUCTION of the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system in Nelson Mandela Bay has been thrown into disarray following new demands by taxi associations.

Operators want the project to be completely redesigned to allow taxis free reign in the city and that new bus lanes be built in certain areas, including Uitenhage and Motherwell.

The transport system, which is a national project and a Fifa prerequisite for all cities hosting World Cup matches next year, has been the cause of a series of transport strikes that have crippled the city during the past four months.

Last week, taxi associations called off the strike after the municipality agreed to negotiate on a possible redesign of the BRT system.

The radical new demands follow a meeting between the municipality and taxi associations on Monday, at which they presented a redesigned plan.

A dedicated BRT committee has until March 2 to study its impact.

Any change of plan is bound to further delay the key 2010 project, which is already behind schedule.

The taxi industry wants both bus and taxi operators to have equal access to BRT infrastructure in the central business district (CBD).

The associations also oppose the idea that they be “feeders” to buses.

Port Elizabeth and District Taxi Association chairman Melekile Hani said they had also suggested that dedicated bus lanes be incorporated in the plan for areas like Motherwell, Uitenhage, Stanford Road and Kempston Road to curb congestion.

“But nothing much was discussed regarding the regulation of the industry and other key areas we are in opposition to. The municipality has agreed to pay, on our behalf, for the drawing up of a business and operational plan.”

Municipal spokesman Kupido Baron confirmed the taxi bodies had submitted their report, but alterations could always be integrated into the current BRT plan. “If the situation constitutes that extra manpower should be brought in to meet the deadline, we will do exactly that.”

However, the municipality could not say when the project would be completed or how far behind schedule it was.

On Monday night, taxi representatives faced the wrath of residents at a meeting organised by the SA National Civics Organisation (Sanco).

Taxi operators were grilled and forced to publicly apologise by angry Motherwell residents for the hardships caused to commuters during last week‘s strike.

Some even insisted Hani be called to the meeting to be reprimanded.

Transport was disrupted and two clinics in Motherwell were also destroyed by fire during the strike.

A Motherwell community leader, Mxolisi Mani, insisted that the taxi representatives give the public reasons for the destruction of their facilities.

“Why must it be us the people who suffer?” he asked. “Why, each time there is a taxi strike, must it be the poor people who are the victims?”

The meeting, attended by councillors, political parties and civic bodies, saw sparks fly as residents threatened to boycott the taxi industry, which they described as being “infiltrated by thugs”.

The situation, which could have got out of hand, was saved by the arrival of councillor Fikile Desi, who urged the residents to “also understand the plight facing the taxi operators, who see the BRT as a means of forcing them out business”.

“Taxi operators are asking for forgiveness. They did that by cutting last Friday‘s taxi fares by half. We should instead say that the next time there is a strike, we should be consulted and that we do not want to see any violence,” Desi said.

Sanco chairman Toni Duba moved the attention of the residents away from the taxi drivers to mayor Nondumiso Maphazi, who he said had failed to attend the meeting although she had been invited.

“We wanted the mayor to come and address the residents. All the problems surrounding the whole BRT system have been caused by her,” said Duba.

In Johannesburg, Transport MEC Ignatius Jacobs said the BRT system would be introduced in Gauteng in time for the Confederations Cup kick-off in Johannesburg on June 14, despite opposition from taxi owners.

Jacobs said taxi owners had been included in the BRT planing process with the City of Johannesburg for the past two years.

“Now, at the stage of implementation, they are asking us to hold on?”

source The Herald

Taxi Striks before 2010

MAYHEM erupted as hundreds of striking taxi drivers ran amok early yesterday, hurling stones at offices and passing cars, attacking municipal workers, setting a vehicle alight, blocking rush- hour traffic and crippling businesses in Nelson Mandela Bay.

Amid widespread condemnation over the wave of violence, urgent talks between city officials and taxi representatives collapsed late last night with defiant drivers vowing the wildcat strike would continue today, leaving thousands of commuters stranded.

Police, who yesterday drafted in reinforcements including the crack flying squad and rapid response unit members, will be on “high alert”. Police Captain Rassie Erasmus declared: “We will not let taxi drivers hold the city to ransom”.

The drama unfolded yesterday when more than 300 taxi drivers opposed to the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system being implemented for the 2010 World Cup blocked major roads including the N2 freeway near Bluewater Bay and the Uitenhage road near Vista University.

Police arrested six people for public violence and confiscated “a number of taxis blocking the roads”. Motorists were left fuming in long traffic jams while many commuters were unable to get to work.

Traffic police and SAPS vehicles were stoned while a municipal vehicle was set alight outside Brister House in Govan Mbeki Avenue.

Police spokesman Captain Johann Rheeder said about 30 men ran up to a municipal car and smashed the windows. “They poured petrol on the car and set it alight.”

Yesterday‘s havoc follows an orgy of violence and looting, which raged in several parts of the city last November, leaving one person dead and others injured.

Police in Nyalas were deployed to quell the protests and officers were forced to fire rubber bullets to disperse crowds.

Nelson Mandela Bay municipal spokesman Kupido Baron said last night: “These violent actions do not belong in a peace-loving society.”

He added that workers at a BRT construction site in Govan Mbeki Avenue were attacked and offices stoned.

However a defiant metro public transport forum spokesman Melekile Hani told The Herald last night: “We are pledging our solidarity to our comrades. We are not going back to work! Until the municipality agrees to suspend work at BRT sites, and we secure the release of our arrested comrades, the strike continues. We apologise to commuters, but they must understand we are at war!”

Meanwhile, Port Elizabeth Regional Chamber of Commerce and Industry chief executive Odwa Mtati said the strike had “succeeded in causing maximum disruption” to businesses. “The shock of it was that no warnings were issued, so it‘s been very disruptive, especially since large parts of the industry only re-opened on Monday.”

The motor industry, particularly General Motors SA, was hit hard. GMSA spokesman Denise van Huyssteen said: “We are disappointed by the surprise strike, which has impacted on our ability to assemble vehicles.

“We only resumed full operations yesterday following a four-week break. Such actions send negative signals about doing business in this country, particularly at a time when we should be promoting political and economic stability.”

Eveready “definitely felt the impact of the strike”, spokesman Curt Bosman said. “Our workers on the afternoon shift have to leave earlier because they won‘t find taxis later, so we‘ll have to stop production. We might not even have nightshift.”

The DA also condemned the violence and chaos. Eastern Cape transport spokesman Pine Pienaar said: “The situation is just not acceptable”.

Kupido said the strike was especially disappointing “since this disruptive behaviour followed after an important meeting on Tuesday between the mayor and the industry.

“A task team consisting of representatives of the taxi industry and the municipality was established with the sole mandate to prepare for a transport indaba which will address the concerns of role-players in the industry.

“Despite this progressive step, some members of the taxi industry still went ahead with strike action and as a result inconvenienced many commuters who unfortunately rely solely on public transport.”

source : The herald